Multiplaning

iaian7 » tutorials » aftereffects   John Einselen, 14.06.07 (updated 27.07.09)    

d = 12; c = thisComp.layer("LAYER").effect("Slider Control")("Slider"); x = transform.position[0]+(c*d); y = transform.position[1]; [x,y]

Affects a layer’s horizontal position via a slider and a multiplier. You’ll need to add a slider effect to your control layer for this to work. I used the expression to create a multi-planing effect using just the slider to control and animate the positions of various clouds in a dramatic sunset.

The value entered for “d” essentially sets the perceived distance of the element, and should be changed for each layer the expression is applied to. Higher numbers will move the layer faster, making them appear closer to the viewer.

d = 12; c0 = thisComp.layer("LAYER").transform.position[0]; c1 = thisComp.layer("LAYER").transform.position[1]; x = transform.position[0]+(c0*d); y = transform.position[1]+(c1*d); [x,y]

Same concept as the previous script, but uses a layer position instead of a slider, and thusly controls both X and Y axis.

the following has yet to be tested, I merely wrote it as a concept

d = 12; c = thisComp.layer("LAYER").effect("Slider Control")("Slider"); x = transform.position[0]+(c*d); [x]

If you have flat artwork in long layers that need to repeatedly scroll past, using After Effect’s layer offset is going to be perfect. Apply the offset effect to each of the layers, making sure that repeat is selected in the overflow options. Then use this expression in the horizontal offset to control your multiplaning!

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